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Discovering the blue
A delicate craft
Pattern No. 1
The Three Waves
Waves of Blue
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The craft

Royal Copenhagen porcelain has been created with rare skills and handcraftsmanship for almost 250 years. From the designer's sketch to the blue painters last brush stroke, the many crafts that go into manufacturing Royal Copenhagen porcelain is what makes every piece precious and unique.

Refined through CENTURIES

Since its inception at the hands of the Danish monarchy in 1775, Royal Copenhagen has excelled in porcelain manufactory, and the meticulous techniques developed by the masters of the past still today pave the way for the creation of every piece of porcelain. 

BESPOKE TOOLS

For centuries, Royal Copenhagen’s skilled craftsmen have developed their own tools to manufacture the fine porcelain. The bespoke tools are looked after with great care and are often passed down through generations. Discover a few of the tools here.

For porcelain carrying a motif, such as the Christmas plates, this tool helps the sculptor carve the designer’s motif in relief in a plaster model.

Though it may appear simple, this straight-forward carving tool has small edges on its blade to bring out more depth and details. 

Developed with a custom handle for a firm grip, this small tool helps the sculptor  modify the surface of a plaster model, creating smooth details. 

Collaborating arts

Many areas of expertise go into the creation of a piece of Royal Copenhagen porcelain. It is a dynamic dance of crafts and a constant collaboration between the many craftsmen of Royal Copenhagen. Explore a small selection of the crafts below.

The designer’s first SKETCH

Though Royal Copenhagen often collaborates with artists and external designers, the factory is home to a talented team of in-house designers who carry the proud aesthetics of Royal Copenhagen into the future – from the very first sketch to the last adjustment of every new piece of porcelain.

The sculptor's
MODEL

The craft of the sculptor lies in carefully and patiently perfecting every little detail of the model that is to become a finished piece of porcelain – a demanding technique that can take several weeks. 

THE CASTING

The casting process is one known by heart by the craftsmen of Royal Copenhagen, and when liquid porcelain has been poured into a mould, the casters know just how long it takes for the mould to absorb the moisture and a perfect porcelain shell to appear.

The ART of glazing

Whether a porcelain piece is painted before or after glazing or not at all,
glazing porcelain requires a firm grip and swift movements to create a thin, glossy layer on the porcelain to highlight its delicate details.

Airbrushed HUES

Not as famous but just as complicated as the hand painting of porcelain is applying colour by airbrush. A technique perfected through decades, airbrushing requires the steady hand of a skilled craftsman to ensure that subtle shades blend together seamlessly on porcelain surfaces.

Historic
STROKES

A craft known by many but mastered by few is the hand painting of Royal Copenhagen porcelain. Fabled through centuries, the fine lines are applied with the light brushstrokes of a craft inherited from blue painter to blue painter through centuries.

A proud legacy

Since the Royal Danish Porcelain Factory opened its doors in the late 1700s, it has been home to the finest of craftsmen, who have passed on their knowledge and expertise through generations and across country borders. All to carry the fine legacy of Royal Copenhagen into the future.

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